What’s on 

Christmas Concert at the Wien Musikverein 15th December 2019 19:30
CONDUCTOR
Wien Musikverein
It has long been a tradition at the Christmas for the Wiener Moonlight Symphoniker to present a program consisting of the lively and at the same time nostalgic music from the vast repertoire of the family of Gustav Mahler and  its contemporaries (Shostakovich, Tchaikovsky,Bellini and Donizetti). These concerts not only delight the audiences in the Musikverein in Vienna, but also enjoy great international popularity.
It has long been a tradition at the Christmas for the Wiener Moonlight Symphoniker to present a program consisting of the lively and at the same time nostalgic music from the vast repertoire of the family of Gustav Mahler and its contemporaries (Shostakovich, Tchaikovsky,Bellini and Donizetti). These concerts not only delight the audiences in the Musikverein in Vienna, but also enjoy great international popularity.
The Wiener Moonlight Symphoniker Christmas Concert Concert will be conducted by Valery Voronin. Valery Voronin, Artistic Director and Chief Conductor of the
State Autonomous Cultural Institution of the Astrakhan Region in Russia "Astrakhan State Theater of Opera and Ballet" V.Voronin. 
He is a regular guest at the subscription concerts in Europe, Asia and USA. 2019 marks Voronin’s first time to conduct the Wiener Moonlight Symphoniker Christmas Concert. 

Valeriy Voronin is a Russian conductor, who made a significant contribution to the development of Russian theatrical art. He strengthened the opera troupe, symphony orchestra, and also increased the level of performances of classical heritage. 
46 performances were staged on the big and small stages of the theater under the artistic direction of Valeriy Voronin.
Valeriy Voronin leads an active concert activity, being a guest conductor of the Astana Opera (Republic of Kazakhstan), the National Symphony Orchestra of the Republic of Bashkortostan, the St. Petersburg State Academic Symphony Orchestra, the Symphony Orchestra of the Krasnoyarsk State Opera and Ballet Theater named after D. Hvorostovsky, symphonic orchestra "Della Callabria" (Italian Republic). In 2017, at the invitation of the administrations of the two largest opera houses of the People’s Republic of China - “Taijin” (Beijing) and “Harbin” (Harbin) V. Voronin participated in the international opera festival named after G. Puccini, where together with the troupe of the Parma Royal Opera took place several performances of the opera “La Bohem” by G. Puccini. In 2018, he took part in the Mediterranean Festival (Lamezia Terme, Italian Republic) performing “Requiem” by V. Mozart and in the festival “Mythos opera” (Taormina, Italian Republic), conducting the opera “Tosca” by G. Puccini.
Valeriy Voronin was nominated for the Russian National Theater Award "Golden Mask" in the nomination "The Best Work of a Conductor" with works by G. Puccini, P. Tchaikovsky, by P. Tchaikovsky and by G. Berlioz.
V.Voronin was awarded by the Ministry of Culture of the Russian Federation for his great contribution to the development of culture, the Certificate of honor of the Ministry of Culture of Russian Federation for many years of diligent work.
The Wiener Moonlight Symphoniker Christmas Concert Concert will be conducted by Valery Voronin. Valery Voronin, Artistic Director and Chief Conductor of the State Autonomous Cultural Institution of the Astrakhan Region in Russia “Astrakhan State Theater of Opera and Ballet” V.Voronin. He is a regular guest at the subscription concerts in Europe, Asia and USA. 2019 marks Voronin’s first time to conduct the Wiener Moonlight Symphoniker Christmas Concert. Valeriy Voronin is a Russian conductor, who made a significant contribution to the development of Russian theatrical art. He strengthened the opera troupe, symphony orchestra, and also increased the level of performances of classical heritage. 46 performances were staged on the big and small stages of the theater under the artistic direction of Valeriy Voronin. Valeriy Voronin leads an active concert activity, being a guest conductor of the Astana Opera (Republic of Kazakhstan), the National Symphony Orchestra of the Republic of Bashkortostan, the St. Petersburg State Academic Symphony Orchestra, the Symphony Orchestra of the Krasnoyarsk State Opera and Ballet Theater named after D. Hvorostovsky, symphonic orchestra “Della Callabria” (Italian Republic). In 2017, at the invitation of the administrations of the two largest opera houses of the People’s Republic of China – “Taijin” (Beijing) and “Harbin” (Harbin) V. Voronin participated in the international opera festival named after G. Puccini, where together with the troupe of the Parma Royal Opera took place several performances of the opera “La Bohem” by G. Puccini. In 2018, he took part in the Mediterranean Festival (Lamezia Terme, Italian Republic) performing “Requiem” by V. Mozart and in the festival “Mythos opera” (Taormina, Italian Republic), conducting the opera “Tosca” by G. Puccini. Valeriy Voronin was nominated for the Russian National Theater Award “Golden Mask” in the nomination “The Best Work of a Conductor” with works by G. Puccini, P. Tchaikovsky, by P. Tchaikovsky and by G. Berlioz. V.Voronin was awarded by the Ministry of Culture of the Russian Federation for his great contribution to the development of culture, the Certificate of honor of the Ministry of Culture of Russian Federation for many years of diligent work.
Symphony no.4 in G Major
A Debut Symphony That Embraced The World
Symphony No. 4 in G major by Gustav Mahler was written in 1899 and 1900, though it incorporates a song originally written in 1892. The song, "Das himmlische Leben", presents a child's vision of Heaven. It is sung by a soprano in the work's fourth and final movement.
Mahler's first four symphonies are often referred to as the Wunderhorn symphonies because many of their themes originate in earlier songs by Mahler on texts from Des Knaben Wunderhorn (The Boy's Magic Horn). The fourth symphony is built around a single song, "Das himmlische Leben" ("The Heavenly Life"). It is prefigured in various ways in the first three movements and sung in its entirety by a solo soprano in the fourth movement.
Mahler composed "Das himmlische Leben" as a freestanding piece in 1892. The title is Mahler's own: in the Wunderhorncollection the poem is called "Der Himmel hängt voll Geigen" (an idiomatic expression akin to "there's not a cloud in the sky"). Several years later Mahler considered using the song as the seventh and final movement of his Symphony No. 3. While motifs from "Das himmlische Leben" are found in the Symphony No. 3, Mahler eventually decided not to include it in that work and, instead, made the song the goal and source of his Symphony No. 4. This symphony thus presents a thematic fulfilment of the musical world of No. 3, which is part of the larger tetralogy of the first four symphonies, as Mahler described them to Natalie Bauer-Lechner. Early plans in which the Symphony was projected as a six-movement work included another Wunderhorn song, "Das irdische Leben" ("The Earthly Life") as a somber pendant to "Das himmlische Leben", offering a tableau of childhood starvation in juxtaposition to heavenly abundance, but Mahler later decided on a simpler structure for the score.
Symphony No. 4 in G major by Gustav Mahler was written in 1899 and 1900, though it incorporates a song originally written in 1892. The song, “Das himmlische Leben”, presents a child’s vision of Heaven. It is sung by a soprano in the work’s fourth and final movement. Mahler’s first four symphonies are often referred to as the Wunderhorn symphonies because many of their themes originate in earlier songs by Mahler on texts from Des Knaben Wunderhorn (The Boy’s Magic Horn). The fourth symphony is built around a single song, “Das himmlische Leben” (“The Heavenly Life”). It is prefigured in various ways in the first three movements and sung in its entirety by a solo soprano in the fourth movement. Mahler composed “Das himmlische Leben” as a freestanding piece in 1892. The title is Mahler’s own: in the Wunderhorncollection the poem is called “Der Himmel hängt voll Geigen” (an idiomatic expression akin to “there’s not a cloud in the sky”). Several years later Mahler considered using the song as the seventh and final movement of his Symphony No. 3. While motifs from “Das himmlische Leben” are found in the Symphony No. 3, Mahler eventually decided not to include it in that work and, instead, made the song the goal and source of his Symphony No. 4. This symphony thus presents a thematic fulfilment of the musical world of No. 3, which is part of the larger tetralogy of the first four symphonies, as Mahler described them to Natalie Bauer-Lechner. Early plans in which the Symphony was projected as a six-movement work included another Wunderhorn song, “Das irdische Leben” (“The Earthly Life”) as a somber pendant to “Das himmlische Leben”, offering a tableau of childhood starvation in juxtaposition to heavenly abundance, but Mahler later decided on a simpler structure for the score.
In Mahler's Symphony 4 a child, voiced by a soprano which will be sung by the  Portuguese Soprano Isolda Soares, presents a sunny, naive vision of Heaven and describes the feast being prepared for all the saints.
The scene has its darker elements: the child makes it clear that the heavenly feast takes place at the expense of animals, including a sacrificed lamb. The child's narrative is punctuated by faster passages recapitulating the first movement. Unlike the final movement of traditional symphonies, the fourth movement of Mahler's No. 4 is essentially a song, containing verses, with interludes, a prelude and a postlude (a strophic structure). By the time the postlude is heard, there is a modulation to E major (the tonic major of the relative minor) and unusually stays in this key, ending the symphony away from the tonic of G major. Several ties to Symphony No. 3 can be heard in these passages as well.
In Mahler’s Symphony 4 a child, voiced by a soprano which will be sung by the Portuguese Soprano Isolda Soares, presents a sunny, naive vision of Heaven and describes the feast being prepared for all the saints. The scene has its darker elements: the child makes it clear that the heavenly feast takes place at the expense of animals, including a sacrificed lamb. The child’s narrative is punctuated by faster passages recapitulating the first movement. Unlike the final movement of traditional symphonies, the fourth movement of Mahler’s No. 4 is essentially a song, containing verses, with interludes, a prelude and a postlude (a strophic structure). By the time the postlude is heard, there is a modulation to E major (the tonic major of the relative minor) and unusually stays in this key, ending the symphony away from the tonic of G major. Several ties to Symphony No. 3 can be heard in these passages as well.